Author Archives: Mark Thompson

We won’t save the Earth with a better kind of disposable coffee cup

The problem is not just plastic: it is mass disposability. Or, to put it another way, the problem is pursuing, on the one planet known to harbour life, a four-planet lifestyle. Regardless of what we consume, the sheer volume of consumption is overwhelming the Earth’s living systems. To read the full article click here!

Edmonton pot grower teams with University of Alberta to turn waste into energy

Atlas Growers announced the Cannabis Waste Project partnership Wednesday, which will develop strategies for the on-site treatment and handling of cannabis waste that could convert it into electricity. “Take the buds off, you’re left with a bunch of different fibre there, what are you going to do with it?” said Jim Hole, VP of cultivation…

China’s Recycling Import Ban: Uncertain Times for Solid Waste Agencies

In July 2017, China notified the World Trade Organization that effective January 2018 it would ban imports of some recycled materials, including mixed paper and most plastics. In March 2018, China went further and implemented a strict new policy limiting contamination levels to 0.5 percent, a near-impossible limit for most single-stream recycling programs. To ensure…

Tariffs And A Trade War Threaten U.S. Paper Recycling

There’s a trade war going on between China and the United States. Billions of dollars in new tariffs have been levied on aluminum and steel and also on recycled paper pulp. While not as well known, the levy on the little-known waste product could bankrupt an already taxed recycling industry. Click here to read more!…

Visualizing What the World Thinks About Waste

Visualizing what the world thinks about waste! This article explores the views of different nations when it comes to waste, recycling & what’s needed to reduce packaging’s impact on the planet. Click here to read the full article!

How one Canadian food court eliminated 117 bags of garbage a day

The food court at Yorkdale Shopping Centre in Toronto used to generate 120 bags of garbage a day. Now it produces just three — despite the fact that it serves noodles, fried chicken, burgers and other fast foods to 24,000 customers a day. Read more…